A Diet for Beauty

Recognition of the impact of biotin on nails led me to think about other ways nutrition can affect  skin health.  There are of course  dozens of food based beauty claims, like salmon, berries and olive oil hold the key to beautiful skin.  Are there any respected peer-reviewed studies that show what if any foods can affect how your skin ages?

The short answer is yes.  And the  most impressive data comes from the  iconic National  Helath and Education study (NHANES).  This massive ( 32,000 adults) nationwide study  examined  food intakes  and  evaluated them in terms of many health problems like heart disease, cancer,  and blood pressure, and fortuneately  for us, skin aging. 

NHANES  looked at three key signs of aging — wrinkles, dryness, and saging.  Their conclusions sent  me running to the … Continue Reading…

Biotin for Beauty

Biotin is a type of vitamin ( actually vitamin B7) that is found in many different foods including liver, cauliflower, salmon, carrots, bananas, and yeast.  Eggs, soy flour, and nuts are especially  high in biotin.

True biotin deficiencies are very rare, occuring  in people with epilepsy, smokers, burn victims,  and elite athletes.  ( no, no, no and definately not me).   However  diabetics  may have an increased need for biotin– and I do have type 2 diabetes. 

However biotin is not easily absorbed  and even if the  daily intake is adequate, your body may not be getting what it needs.  Neither the US  nor Canada have issued nutritional guidelines for biotin.  Accordingly  they have estimated daily requirements at 30-100 micrograms.

I made a field trip to   my neighborhood vitamin store.  When … Continue Reading…

Biotin for Broken Nails

I’ve never had any problem with my nails– until now that is.  In the past six weeks my nails have gone from strong and shiny  to soft and brittle.  I’ve tried two different nail hardeners with no luck.  Doing a little online research, I learned that  low levels of  Biotin are linked to broken nails.  This is not a rumour or an urban  nutrition myth,  but a link backed up  by  well designed peer reviewed studies.

Best sources of Biotin are eggs, soy beans and nuts.  Ah a clue!  I try to avoid soy products,  limit  nuts ( calories) and since the summer salmonella outbreak, avoided all eggs.  Since my nail problems started six weeks ago and it takes several months for nutritional deficiencies  to show, the … Continue Reading…

Retin A — Week 4

This is getting a little boring.  Using  this Retin A  2x a week  is not causing problems– but I’m not feeling it.  Where is the glow?   I’m beginning to believe  that the generic ( read cheap) Retin A does not  have  what it takes to get the job done.  I’ve committed  to using the product for at least eight weeks  to  see changes in facial imaging from Dr Katz.  I think I’m going to give  into the temptation  and apply it every other night for a few weeks, then step it up to  every night.

Lets see what happens.  I know my face is going to be  rough and irritated, but  if the end point is  healthier skin, its worth the trouble.  I have been talking to  women who have been using  Retin A “for years” and who  are not impressed with the results.  I’m beginning to wonder if they are  … Continue Reading…

Did Botox Work? Judge For Yourself

I had my first shot of baby Botox on Monday  and took after pictures on Wednesday night.  According to Dr Marmur, the full effect has not yet developed, but 48 hours after getting “tox”, I can  see a clear difference. The lines  at the sides of my chin  and cheek are visibly diminished  creating a firmer  more youthful contour. 

   BEFORE BOTOX

I am pleased that an anti-aging product worked  as promised, but I’m still giggling about the Botox high.  Apparently this is a well known effect, but nobody writes about it.  Have you had this reaction to Botox? 

The maximum benefits  should be produced by next week and I’ll post those results too.  … Continue Reading…

Baby Botox

No, Baby Botox, is not Botox for babies.  It means a very low Botox concentration  to erase wrinkles that stills leaves  a full range of  expression and movement.  On Monday I had  an injection of “baby Botox” into the marionette lines at the sides of  my chin. Sitting on the examination table, I was so scared my knees were quivering.  Dr Marmur told me to push out my lower jaw and frown.  I could feel a little rush with each jab of the Botox injection.  Almost instantly, my anxiety level was replaced by  an awesome sense of contentment.  Zoloft could certainly take a few lessons from Botox.

The full impact will not be  seen for a few days, but within six hours I could see a remarkable difference.   I have loved the life I have had — my  family,  work,  friends and travel– but when I caught my reflection  in a mirror, it … Continue Reading…

Big Girl Retin A– Week 2

I’m learning  how to deal with this uber-strength Retin A.  I’ve stepped back  and now  using it every three days, rather than every other day.  The white flaky bits  are gone  and I can see a bit of a glow– rather than a chalky pallor.  When  we think of aging, wrinkles and lines are what  usually come to mind.  But its that dull  pale skin ( a combo of  a slow down in circulation and  increased dryness) that is making the skin  seem old and tired.   Every cell in my body  wants to  speed up  my anti-aging project– but I’ve learned to respect the process and  take it  slower.

I wait a full hour  between washing my face and applying the new Retin A.  After … Continue Reading…

Glycolic Acid: Five Top Questions

Glycolic Acid is an amazing anti-aging tool. Used in a peel it  gives the skin a fresh rosy glow tht lasts for hours.  In a moisturizer,  glycolic acid increases cell renewal,  stimulates collagen and reduces wrinkles– sort of  a baby steps  Retin A. The trick is getting  maximum  benefits.

1.  What’s the difference between a glycolic peel at home and an office based peel?

The glycolic peel you can buy in stores contains 10-12% glycolic acid.  It will give your skin a little extra boost and a bit of a glow.  Cost:  $2/treatment.  THe office based peel uses 30-70% glycolic acid.  It can  leave your skin pretty red, and by the next day, somewhat flaky.  Everything calms down within 48 hours leaving your skin especially smooth and fresh.  Cost:  Range form $100-150 per session.  Home peels can be used several times a week, while office based peels are used no more than once a … Continue Reading…