What’s the Problem with Strivectin

Strivectin questionQuestion:  I recently saw on  ABC news that the FDA  has criticized Strivectin and its anti-aging claims.  What does this mean? Is it dangerous? I’ve used it three months.  Can I get my money back?

Answer: Don’t worry! The FDA  did not say Strivectin was harmful.  Their official letter to the company challenged their claims and promises made about several products:

1. “Clinically proven to change anatomy of  wrinkle”

2. “This superb age-fighting serum is super charged with potent elastin stimulating peptides

3. “Potent elastin-stimulating peptides help enhance  skin structure”

Elastin and  its big brother, collagen are the  fibers in the skin  which keep it firm and smooth.  As age and sunlight weaken these fibers, lines and wrinkles  will develop. But anything that can actually increase growth of elastin or collagen is … Continue Reading…

Anti-Aging Claims and the FDA

collection of cosmetic productsCan anti-aging products really deliver as promised?  The FDA is not so sure and in recent months sent  warning letters to several  cosmetic  compaies including  Avon and L’Oreal.  Their concern?  Questionnable claims made for some of  their skin care products that included ” improve condition around stem cells”, “boosts activity of genes”,  and “stimulates production of youth proteins” (???).

Can You Believe What You Read?

By law, the FDA defines cosmetics as a product used for cleansing and beautifying, but if it affects structure or function of the skin or body, it is classified as a drug.  And if its a  drug, it must go through extensive clinical trials to prove its both safe and effective.  The FDA is asking that  Avon  and L’Oreal  either  prove their claims or change … Continue Reading…

Trading Up My Retin A

I’ve noticed that my skin had become very comfortable with  my .o4% Retin A Micro– maybe too comfortable.  It didn’t sting when I applied it right after washing my face, and I didn’t  see as much of the the rosy glow. After seven months of almost daily use, it  was time to graduate to a stronger version.  Dr Marmur gave  me a script for .1% Retin-A cream.  This is considerably stronger not only in concentration but in formulation as well.  It is also considerably cheaper.

Since Retin-A is now off- patent and there are generic versions, the prices  are lower, even in a US pharmacy.  A standard tube of branded Retin A is $129 at my local  Duane Reade. At my online Canadian pharmacy, I have two choices:

1.  Generic Retin A, which is labeled Tretinion,  is about $43 for about 40 grams ( about 1.5  oz) and made in Canada.

2. Branded  Retin A, is about the … Continue Reading…

Me and My Under Eye Shadows, Part 2

Eliminating or at least reducing dark circles depends on what is causing them in the first place.  For shadows caused by melanin ( from sun exposure) ingredients is focused on techniques that ” bleach”  out the darkened skin tone.  There are  shelves of products which contain ingredients such as hydroquione, kojic acid, azaleic acid and niacinamide.  Other products contain caffeine which are known to shrink blood vessels.  The theory here is that  swollen capillaries  in the eye area make make the skin look puffy and leak  minute amounts of blood into the skin.  Sounds reasonable, but we’ll have to see.  Another category of ingredients  such as Haloxyl claim that they can break down the hemoglobin ( from the leaked blood) that are causing the shadows.  I am trying to get  my hands on the clinical trials that support these claims, but I know Haloxyl are used in  a  number of expensive brands.

I found two interesting candidates– Skin Renew Anti–Puff … Continue Reading…