The Beauty of Bok Choy

bok choyI love to buy fruits and vegetables at Farmer’s Markets.  I think the food  is fresher, tastes better  and I can pick up  new varieties   not found in supermarkets.  Last week I  scored   what I thought was a gorgeous head of sparkling fresh spinach.   It was 15″ inches across, weighed about 3 pounds and was only $3.  What a buy!  But when I got  home and nibbled on a leaf, I discovered it was bok choy not spinach.  Bok choy is a popular form of  chinese cabbage that is used in soups, stir fried combo’s and  as  side vegetable dish. But from a nutitional  stand point, how does it compare to  the nutrient packed spinach?

Turns out, not too bad.  Bok choy clocks in at just 13 calories in … Continue Reading…

Cottage Cheese- good news/bad news

When I was in high school  a ball of cottage cheese  on a ring of canned pineapple was the ultimate diet meal.  Former President Nixon made headlines when  he shared that his favorite lunch was cottege cheese topped with ketchup. For years these slightly sour milk curds were  the ultimate symbol of weight control.  Over the years, cottage cheese has fallen out of favor — a loss for easy  healthy meal plans. 

Cottage cheese is made  from the separation of solids and liquid in milk.  The whey is poured off and the cuds are rinsed, but not pressed into true cheese.  ( and yes, this  is where the nursery rhyme “curds and whey” came from). Cottage cheese is a wonderful source of  protein and vitamin B12.  One half cup of full fat … Continue Reading…

The Magic of Mushrooms

Mushrooms are one of my favorite  veggies– except that they’re really not a vegetable at all.  Mushrooms are a fungus- a plant that has no leaves, no roots, and no seeds.   Mushrooms don’t have chlorophyll, vitamin A or vitamin C.  But its not what they aren’t or don’t have that make mushrooms  so important for a healthy diet. 

Mushrooms have this wonderful meaty texture yet clock in at only 20 calories per cup which delivers a few grams of protein as well as healthy amounts of B vitamins and iron. Keep in mind that dried mushrooms lose a good deal of  this nutrition.  Fresh cooked mushrooms have 3X the niacin, 2X the iron and 15X the riboflavin of serving of canned mushrooms.  This is not such a hardship since canned … Continue Reading…

Kale: The Ultimate Beauty Food

I’m working my way through the vegetable aisle, picking out items in no particular order.  Recently I added  big bunch of curly kale to my cart  and started to explore its nutritional profile.  I was blown away!  This common, affordable leafy green is so high in nutrients its ridonkulus.  One half cup of cooked kale,  which clocks in at just 21 calories, is practically bursting with a boatload of the strongest  antioxidants.  Its got twice the RDA for both vitamin A and vitamin C–both key anti-wrinkling nutrients.  It even has respectable  servings of calcium, iron and fiber.  But wait there’s more.  There is evidence that  kale is anti-inflammatory, offering a healthy dose of cancer fighting indoles.  Even better, Kale preserves these nutrients   after steaming, a stint in the microwave  or stir … Continue Reading…